W1siziisijiwmtqvmdyvmjkvmtuvmtkvmjkvmjqxl2htyw5zx2j1zxjzdguyx3nxdwfyzs5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijmwmhgzmdajil1d?sha=e70f445e784e7667
In reply to: doyou.even.computer/uaz785
Absolutely - I guess you could theoretically hook up a whole series of non-IndieWeb services here.

Don’t think anyone wants more email at this point. Maybe it could integrate with something like https://pushover.net?

Absolutely - I guess you could theoretically hook up a whole series of non-IndieWeb services here. The overall idea is to make it as easy as possible for newcomers (and I’m talking about actual people, not their servers) to receive webmentions, no matter what platform they’re using for their site (which could even be entirely static.)

Addendum to my Webmention ramblings from earlier: What would be the minimum interface a hosted Webmention service would need to implement to get new people on board?

Addendum to my Webmention ramblings from earlier:

What would be the minimum interface a hosted Webmention service would need to implement to get new people on board? Aaron’s webmention.io already does a great job of enabling you to add Webmentions to your actual site, but I imagine that this already is too much for a lot of people who’re just using Wordpress or Tumblr and don’t really want to (or simply can’t) bother with the technical details.

Couldn’t a Webmention service like webmention.io simply ask for the authenticated user’s email address and then send them email notifications whenever a webmention is received? Even if these pings wouldn’t appear on the user’s site, it would at least make IndieWeb replies visible to them, which is a great start. Thoughts?

A couple of recent questions and discussions on Twitter reminded me that #Webmention, while being a very simple protocol, isn’t anywhere near the level of acceptance and prevalence that it deserves.

A couple of recent questions and discussions on Twitter reminded me that #Webmention, while being a very simple protocol, isn’t anywhere near the level of acceptance and prevalence that it deserves.

Here’s the thing: because this site supports Webmention, you can leave comments on any of my posts by using a Webmention-Ping-capable piece of software. It doesn’t matter what you use, as long as it speaks Webmention, you can use it to reply to my posts, and your reply will not only be hosted on your own site (which is good for you, because you own it), but also be linked to (and in many cases displayed verbatim) under my post (which is also good for you, because your comment becomes visible.)

Yet, this is only useful for very few of you, since there’s precious little software that actually speaks Webmention. I’d wager that unless you’re already deep into IndieWeb, you will probably have never used Webmention-compatible software, and you’d also have a hard time finding something to use. For normal people, Webmention is simply too hard to use, which is a catastrophic irony, considering the protocol’s simplicity.

The Number 1 question I get about Pants is: “Why is there no comment form?” I fully understand why this is, but I will continue to push Webmention instead of giving in and hosting other people’s comments like it’s 2003.1

Pants is my contribution to make Webmention and related technologies more prevalent, but there’s a whole lot more we need to do. Ideally, someone would take a popular blogging platform like Wordpress and make it fully IndieWeb compatible. When it comes to adding Webmention support to pre-IndieWeb applications, you’ll probably want to take into account the following three cornerstones:

  1. A piece of publishing software needs to be able to receive Webmentions by implementing a Webmention endpoint. This is relatively straight-forward to do.
  2. A piece of publishing software also needs to be able to send Webmentions, ie. ping URLs embedded in posts that have the relevant markup (in-reply-to et al.) This is relatively straight forward to do, but slightly less trivial since you’ll probably want to perform these pings asynchronously.
  3. Last but not least, a piece of webmention-enabled publishing software needs to have a good interface to actually notify its owner about incoming webmentions (and possibly give them a little bit of control over how these are processed.) Cramming this into legacy, pre-IndieWeb applications is probably the most work. I guess in something like Wordpress, this would probably be integrated into the comments moderation/notification system? I’m not sure, it’s been a while.

I feel the combination of Webmentions and sane microformat markup are the lingua franca of the web publishing world, the minimum interface that web publishing applications should support to be able to interface with each other. Let’s keep pushing this.

  1. I should note that there is an ongoing effort to add “a comment form” to Pants, but it’ll work in a fully IndieWeb compatible manner behind the scenes.

Als jemand, der gerne bloggt und seine eigene Seite zum Publizieren nutzt, sich für das IndieWeb interessiert und versucht, auch in Anderen dieses Interesse zu wecken, muss ich wohl im Juni zur fre...

Als jemand, der gerne bloggt und seine eigene Seite zum Publizieren nutzt, sich für das IndieWeb interessiert und versucht, auch in Anderen dieses Interesse zu wecken, muss ich wohl im Juni zur freundlichen Internet-Konferenz nebenan mit “Vorträgen und Diskussionen rund um Webkultur, Storytelling und Indieweb”, von denen der einzige über IndieWeb die Frage stellt, warum niemand mehr bloggt, seine eigene Seite zum Publizieren nutzen möchte oder sich für das IndieWeb interessiert. Ahja, da bin ich ja mal gespannt. :)

In reply to: pants.gorgmorg.de/gbu605
I’ve been having this on/off thing with games for a while now, but it was never as bad as how Bloodborne makes me feel.

It happened to me several times already and i am actually even older than you… not that old, of course.

I’ve been having this on/off thing with games for a while now, but it was never as bad as how Bloodborne makes me feel. So let me talk about Bloodborne for a bit. The following is my own, personal, very likely flawed view of the game. It’s probably not fair and possibly not even correct.

Bloodborne and the Souls games are a scam. A scam in which with every new game, the reviews claim that finally, the FROM formula has become accessible enough so more people can enjoy these games. I have found this to be wrong; each and every game in the series (and I’m counting Bloodborne as an entry in the Souls series) has been just as unforgiving and punishing as the games before.

Punishing and unforgiving not only in the sense that they’re hard, but also that they’re simply not very fun. The stories they tell are decidedly non-fun, set in non-fun worlds inhabited by non-fun characters. Even ignoring the high difficulty, the FROM games are probably the harshest, non-fun games I’ve ever seen.

I understand that if you spend enough time with them, you will start seeing and possibly even appreciating the lore, and you will find that there is more to the world and the stories and maybe even the characters than you initially realized; but I think this is mostly a trick your mind is playing on you, as anything that you spend enough time with will eventually meld into something you enjoy.

For me – and I know I will be mocked for this – the Souls games are steps backward in the worst kind possible, not only offering a challenge that supposedly imitates “games of old” (which is not the case – “old” games were never this hard), but also a decidedly un-fun, un-friendly, un-inviting and un-inclusive gaming experience.

If there are games that I like to play while someone else (sane, non-gaming, like my wife) is in the room – and there are many –, then the Souls games are the exact opposite.

But still, after reading the glowing reviews giving assurances that yes, this time even you will like this type of game, people like myself end up buying the latest title, the reviews can’t be wrong, right? And end up disappointed. Again and again.

And Bloodborne is now being hailed as the first true system seller for the PS4, a must-have title. It has a Metascore of 93. Everybody and their dog is loving the game. If you voice even the slightest criticism, the fanbois (and grrls?) will tear you to bits. People will probably tell me that I’m simply not good enough for these games, and while I wouldn’t necessarily disagree with them, I wonder how many of them were actually around to play the challenging, old games that FROM’s titles are supposed to harken back to?

I seriously don’t understand how gaming works anymore.

I don’t know why this is happening now, but I think I’m joining the falling-out-of-love-with-games bandwagon.

I don’t know why this is happening now, but I think I’m joining the falling-out-of-love-with-games bandwagon.

The new(ish) consoles are an uninspired retread of what’s come before at best, with most of their best games being rereleases of previous-generation titles.

Mobile gaming has turned into a parody of itself, ignoring its vast potential in favor of cheap tricks to make you spend another little bit of cash and then drop you like a hot potato.

PC AAA gaming simply doesn’t interest me at all, and it’s been a long time since an Indie game really hooked me.

Nintendo? No idea, I don’t think I’m compatible with it anymore.

I don’t understand the whole streaming business. Well, actually, I do understand it, it’s just so far removed from what I would consider worth my time.

I don’t know what happened. I don’t think it’s age (I’m not that old.) Is it a side effect of having a kid?

In a decade or so, my kid will be doing things that I will probably not understand, and it scares me. Maybe my falling out of love with a hobby that has entertained me for the better part of the last four decades is just me bracing for the impact of realizing that our kids will do things very differently, putting the final nail into the coffin of something I once held dear.

QQ

Cities: Skylines may be the game that I will finally be getting a gaming PC for.

Cities: Skylines may be the game that I will finally be getting a gaming PC for. That is all.

Wir ziehen um; von Hoheluft-West (ca. 16k Menschen pro Quadratkilometer) nach Groß Flottbek (ca. 4k Menschen pro Quadratkilometer).

Imgur

Wir ziehen um; von Hoheluft-West (ca. 16k Menschen pro Quadratkilometer) nach Groß Flottbek (ca. 4k Menschen pro Quadratkilometer). Und irgendwie verspüre ich vor dieser Veränderung sehr viel mehr Nervosität als vor der Geburt unseres Sohnes. Vielleicht, weil immer klar war, dass wir das, was uns durch den Kleinen erwarten würde, immer bedingungslos hinnehmen müssten, während man sich so einen Umzug ja doch noch einmal überlegen oder, wenn es wirklich ganz schlimm ist, nach ein paar Monaten wieder umziehen könnte.

Die Wohnung ist ein bisschen größer als die alte (mit Kinder- und Arbeitszimmer, hurra), aber auch doppelt so teuer, ein bisschen weniger hübsch, und an einer gut befahrenen Straße (statt der Oase, in der wir bisher verweilten.) Übergeben wurde sie uns frisch saniert, aber mit komplett verschmutzten Fenstern und Urinspuren auf der Klobrille – in Hamburg muss man so etwas leider hinnehmen können.

Wahrscheinlich muss man sich einfach darauf verlassen, dass alles total super wird, wenn man sich erst einmal eingerichtet hat. Zur Not kann man ja wieder ausziehen.

In reply to: widerwille.com/qac630
Please do yourself a favor and wait – unless it’s okay to wipe your data every now and then (and I’m serious about this – this isn’t maintainer-sprek for “it’s really unstable”. It’s actually quite...

So, IndiePants… Should I upgrade already or wait some more?

Please do yourself a favor and wait – unless it’s okay to wipe your data every now and then (and I’m serious about this – this isn’t maintainer-sprek for “it’s really unstable”. It’s actually quite stable! But you will need to reset your database eventually.)

The reason is the following: the database schema is still pretty much in flux, and instead of adding more and more Rails database migrations for every little change I make, I currently still work with the original migrations, which is a complete no-go in large-team and/or already-live projects, but neither is IndiePants already live, nor is a large team working on it. \o/

If you want to give it a try, the bundled heroku_bootstrap script is probably the fastest way to get it up and running (well, on Heroku), but please only do this if you want to see if the code is real (it is.) You will lose your data, and possibly your sanity.

We’re about to move into a new apartment, which is going to occupy a major part of my spare time over the next ~5 weeks, so progress will a bit slower than it has been recently. I’m hoping to be able to launch the new Pants some time May-ish.

Woohoo, IndiePants will finally store uploaded images in the database by default, thanks to the newly improved support for PostgreSQL in ActiveRecord.

Woohoo, IndiePants will finally store uploaded images in the database by default, thanks to the newly improved support for PostgreSQL in ActiveRecord. I did have to switch to the current HEAD of Rails 4.2.1 (which isn’t officially released yet), but other than that, implementing this was trivial. Check out my custom Dragonfly data store which uses a very simple ActiveRecord model to access a just as simple table. This table has a bytea column, which ActiveRecord now supports as binary.

I could probably have executed queries directly without going through ActiveRecord, but my gut tells me that this will eventually be useful for querying the binaries table. Also, I’m lazy.

Storing binary data in the database often evokes an unpleasant reaction in developers, the biggest worry being about performance. Well, turns out PostgreSQL is actually really good at handling binary data – and even if it wasn’t, it would probably still perform better than pulling files off S3 over and over again. In the end, no matter what you do, you will want to cache served images on the HTTP level (which is heaps of fun with the way Dragonfly works, as you don’t need to manually expire cache keys.) Either way, if you want to host Pants on your own server and don’t want to put binary data into your database, you can simply reconfigure Dragonfly to use S3, the local file system (not recommended), or whatever other data store you prefer.

In reply to: deruku.de/hzg928
IndiePants is a big new version of Pants, big enough to be its own project on GitHub – when it launches, it will simply replace Pants, without a rename. “IndiePants” is simply a working title; I co...

So #Pants != IndiePants? I thought it was supposed to be a rename.

IndiePants is a big new version of Pants, big enough to be its own project on GitHub – when it launches, it will simply replace Pants, without a rename. “IndiePants” is simply a working title; I could have called it “Pants 2.0”, but using a version number simply didn’t feel right.

The name stems from the fact that this new version has significantly improved support for IndieWeb schemas and protocols; in fact, Microformats2 and Webmention are taking center stage now, instead of being an extra in a mostly proprietary environment. Removing the old non-IndieWeb code also allowed me to significantly improve performance and portability.

DIS GON B GUD!

:’(

nimoy

:’(

In reply to: pants.jemu.name/udb269
I don’t think there are any beyond those that you can see listed on my Following page (of which many have already been abandoned, unfortunately.) So all in all I would wager that you’re not missing...

networking pants

My #pants network has been stagnating for quite a while now.
So… How would I go about discovering other #pants blogs?

I don’t think there are any beyond those that you can see listed on my Following page (of which many have already been abandoned, unfortunately.) So all in all I would wager that you’re not missing much at the moment.

This is partly my fault, as I haven’t really been driving people towards #Pants a lot lately, the primary reason for this being my ongoing work on IndiePants (which, by the way, is shaping up nicely.) Once I’ve deployed the new code and migrated everyone I can to it, I will get back to pestering people about Pants in every channel known to man (and cat), and it’s going to be beautiful!

Hopefully you’re not disappointed by the currently somewhat minute amount of activity. If you are, I’m hoping to be able to convince you to take another look by the time the new bits are online.

In reply to: pants.thomasjachmann.com/ylx088
I love Lua (apparently I’m expected to give a quick talk about it at the next RUGHH meetup), but it’s simply not built for the kind of system-level, package-oriented scripting we know from other sc...

Well, it works and is quite easy to bend to my will. But so were Phoenix and Hydra. Yes, I actually went through almost all incarnations of sdegutis’ automation tools, migrating my config again and again… luarocks (which is used to install Mjolnir’s extensions) sucks a bit, though. Sometimes, the extensions cannot be loaded and have to be reinstalled. Also, there’s no easy way to upgrade all installed rocks. But Mjolnir itself is stable.

I love Lua (apparently I’m expected to give a quick talk about it at the next RUGHH meetup), but it’s simply not built for the kind of system-level, package-oriented scripting we know from other scripting languages. But holy crap, OpenResty (nginx + Lua) is a thing of beauty.

In reply to: pants.thomasjachmann.com/ret953
Are you happy with Mjolnir?

Have a look at my Mjolnir (Phoenix’s grandchild so to say) config:

Are you happy with Mjolnir? I love Lua, but haven’t had a chance to try this yet.

In reply to: pants.f5n.de/ihv531
That’s actually a great idea and the first time that I’m tempted to go multi-desktop. (Actually, I may end up hacking this into my Phoenix configuration instead.)
  • terminals - Win-1
  • editor - Win-2
  • browser - Win-3
  • irc/jabber - Win-4
  • mail - Win-5

That’s actually a great idea and the first time that I’m tempted to go multi-desktop. (Actually, I may end up hacking this into my Phoenix configuration instead.)

I recently switched to Atom as my primary editor.

I recently switched to Atom as my primary editor. Yes, it takes ages to start up. Yes, I still fundamentally disagree with the concept of feeding potentially system-destroying code to a non-sandboxed Node process. But I’m still enjoying it; the overall performance has vastly improved over the last couple of months, there are some nice plugins, and it just feels good to be using a piece of software that is under active, rapidly iterating development.

But I’m having the weirdest problem with something I was not expecting: Atom’s default application icon is invisible to me. No, I’m not colorblind or anything; I can perfectly see it, my brain just doesn’t seem to associate it with “code editing”. Worse, I usually end up switching to Textual (my IRC client) instead. Textual’s icon is nice and fat and purple and just screams “code”. I’ve been trying to break this habit, with no success.

dock

There’s a surprising number of alternative Atom icons out there, but every update of the application will wipe it, and I just can’t be bothered to re-apply a custom icon over and over again. I’m hoping that at some point in the future, Atom plugins are able to install new icons, or maybe my brain magically fixes itself.

(Yes, I know you are using Vim. Good for you!)

In reply to: pants.morgvom.org/itt293
Ah.

Wenn jetzt jemand, der keinen Pants-Blog hat einen Pants-Blog besucht, tut er das wegen den Blogs und Webmentions und die internen Konversationen, die Pants-User unter sich führen, sind für ihn weniger interessant. Deswegen fände ich eine optische Unterscheidung der Replys innerhalb Pants zur besseren Übersicht nicht schlecht.

Ah. Uh. Da muss ich mal drüber nachdenken. Prinzipiell hänge ich sehr da dran, dass in Pants (genau wie im Web selbst) alles eine Antwort auf etwas anderes sein kann. Was ich aber auf jeden Fall einbauen möchte ist, dass man beim Schreiben einer Antwort aussuchen kann, ob diese auch im eigenen Blog (= auf der Startseite und im ATOM-Feed) publiziert wird. Diese Information kann ich dann auch beim Syndizieren an andere User verwenden, um sie entsprechend unterschiedlich zu rendern.

In reply to: www.marco.org/2015/02/16/google-and-blogs-shit
Marco Arment: Well.

Marco Arment:

Every hour we spend on Twitter or Facebook instead of reading and writing elsewhere is just making this worse — and I’m as guilty as anyone.

Social networks have powerful benefits and are here to stay. But like any trend, we’ve swung too far in that direction for our own good, as both producers and consumers. I hope the pendulum starts to swing back soon, because it hasn’t yet. It’s going to get worse before it gets better, if it ever does.

If we want it to get better, we need to start pushing back against the trend, modernizing blogs, and building what we want to come next.

Well.

In reply to: pants.morgvom.org/pby650
Hm, naja… :) Huch, ich fürchte, das musst du mir näher erklären.

Wünschen würde ich mir eine Profilseite, wobei ich mir fast sicher bin, dass @hmans.de die bereits fertig hat

Hm, naja… :)

und vielleicht noch eine optische Trennung zwischen internen und externen Replys, auch, um Besuchern von Extern einen besseren Überblick zu verschaffen.

Huch, ich fürchte, das musst du mir näher erklären. Interne vs. externe Replies? Huh?